Bodybuilding Net
  Bodybuilding Allgemein
  Bruce lee: zitatensammlung ehem. weggefährten und anderes wissenswerte

Neuen Beitrag erstellen  Antwort schreiben
supplements | geräte | fatburner | prohormone | suche

Neueste Beiträge
Author Bruce lee: zitatensammlung ehem. weggefährten und anderes wissenswerte
chriss

Beiträge: 3
Aus:
Registriert: 05.04.2001

28.03.2004 17:19     Profil von chriss   chriss eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
U.a. ein Interview mit dem ersten Schüler und Freund Jesse Glover. Auch zur Frage Bruce vs. Ali sagt er etwas und der muss es ja wissen. Vorher noch ein paar Fakten über seine Fähigkeiten: Er demonstrierte seinen berühmte unglaubliche Schnelligkeit anhand der Münzeinlage. Er gibt jemandem eine Münze in die Hand und sagt, jetzt kannst Du die Hand schließen wann immer Du willst. Er tauscht die Münze aus bevor derjenige seine Hand geschlossen hat. Und das dauert ja nichtmal 0.5 Sek!! So geschehen mit seinem Freund und Hollywoodstar James Coburn der dieses beschrieb. ( JC van Damme in Anlehnung an Bruce macht es in dem Film Bloodsport mit dem Araber - da ist es allerdings nur Kameratrick!! logischerweise ) Er konnte eine 50kg Langhantel 10 Sekunden mit korrekt gestreckten Armen vor dem Körper halten. Eine 60kg immerhin noch ein paar Sekunden korrekt. Es gibt Aussagen von Kameramännern und Regisseuren, welche mit ihm zusammen arbeiteten, das er sich vor der Kamera bremsen musste, da die Schläge im Orginaltempo unglaubwürdig wären. Manche Szenen wurden langsamer ablaufen gelassen. Bruce selbst sagte, dass er nur mit halber Kraft vor der Kamera agieren konnte, sonst waren seine Schläge und Tritte nicht mehr zu glaubwürdig zu erkennen. In der Öffentlichkeit in Parks etc. zeigte er wie er z.B. 8 Bretter die fest zusammengebunden waren und jedes 5 cm dick – insg.40 cm Holz mit einem Tritt durchschlug. Generell hielt er aber nichts von solchen Demos, da es nix mit Kampf oder Können zu tun hatte... es war für ihn Blödsinn. Zitate Bruce lee – Wenn Du so gegen eine Palme treten kannst das nicht du sondern die Palme draufgeht dann beginnst du zu verstehen, was ein Kick ist.” Chuck Norris - "Lee, pound for pound, might well have been one of the strongest men in the world, and certainly the quickest". Danny Inosanto - "Bruce had tremendous strength in holding a weight out horizontally in a standing position. I know because I've seen it. He'd take a 125lb barbell and hold it straight out". COOL!!!! ist das folgende: Danny Inosanto - "Bruce was only interested in strength that he could readily convert to power. I remember once Bruce and I were walking along the beach in Santa Monica. All of a sudden this huge bodybuilder came walking by, and I said to Bruce "Man, look at the arms on that guy" I'll never forget his reaction, he said "Yeah, he's big, but is he powerful???". Jesse Glover - "Bruce would take hold of a 75lb dumbbell with ONE arm and raise it slowly to a lateral position, level to his shoulder and then he'd hold the contraction for a bout 5 seconds. Nobody else I knew could even get it up there, let it alone hold it up there". Jesse Glover - "When he could do push ups on his thumbs and push ups with 250lbs on his back, he moved on to other exercises". Herb Jackson - "Bruce was interested in becoming as strong as possible". Herb Jackson - "The biggest problem in designing equipment for Bruce was that he'd go through it so damn fast. I had to reinforce his wooden dummy with automobile parts so he could train on it without breaking it. I had started to build him a mobile dummy that could actually attack and retreat to better simulate "Live" combat, sadly Bruce died before the machine was built. It would have been strung up by big high-tension cables that I was going to connect between two posts, one on either side of his backyard. The reason for the machine was simply because no one could stand up to his full force punches and kicks, Bruce's strength and skill had evolved to point where he had to fight machines. Bruce was very interested in strength training, you could say that he was obsessed with it". Wally Jay - "I last saw Bruce after he moved from Culver City to Bel Air. He had a big heavy bag hanging out on his patio. It weighed 300lbs. I could hardly move it at all. Bruce said to me "Hey, Wally, watch this" and he jumped back and kicked it and this monster of a heavy bag went up to the ceiling, Thump!!! And came back down. I still can't believe the power that guy had". Hayward Nishioka - "Bruce had this trademark "One Inch Punch", he could send individuals (Some of whom outweighed him by over 100lbs) flying through the air where they'd crash to the ground 15 feet away. I remember getting knocked up against the wall by that punch. I didn't think it was possible that he could generate so much power in his punch, especially when he was just laying his hand against my chest, he just twitched a bit and Wham!!!, I went flying backward and bounced off a wall. I took him very seriously after that." Jesse Glover - "The power that Lee was capable of instantly generating was absolutely frightening to his fellow martial artists, especially his sparring partners, and his speed was equally intimidating. We timed him with an electric timer once, and Bruce's quickest movements were around five hundredths of a second, his slowest were around eight hundredths. This was punching from a relaxed position with his hands down at his sides from a distance between 18-24 inches. Not only was he amazingly quick, but he could read you too. He could pick up on small subtle things that you were getting ready to do and then he'd just shut you down". Doug Palmer - "Bruce was like the Michael Jordan or Muhammad Ali in his prime, somebody who stood above everyone else. It's not that the other martial artists weren't good. It's just that this guy was great". Jesse Glover - "Bruce was gravitating more and more toward weight training as he would use the weighted wall pulleys and do series upon series with them. He'd also grab one of the old rusty barbells that littered the floor at the YMCA and would roll it up and down his forearms, which is no small feat when you consider that the barbell weighed 70lbs". Herb Jackson - "He never trained in a gym, he thought he could concentrate better at home, so he worked out on his patio. He had a small weight set, something like a standard 100lb cast-iron set. In addition, he had a 310lb Olympic barbell set, a bench press and some dumbbells, both solid and adjustable". Karreem Abdul Jabbar - "Bruce put me on a weight training program during the summer of 1970. It was a three days a week program, comprised mainly of the same stuff he was doing for the major muscle groups. I think I was doing about 2 sets of 12 reps, but it worked". Danny Inosanto - "Bruce would always shadow box with small weights in his hands and he'd do a drill in which he'd punch for 12 series in a row. 100 punches per series, using a pyramid system of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10lb dumbbells and then he'd reverse the pyramid and go 10, 7, 5, 3, 2, 1 and finally zero weight. He had me do this drill with him and man what a burn you'd get in your delts and arms." Linda Lee - "Bruce was forever pumping a dumbell which he kept in the house. He had the unique ability to do several things at once. It wasn't at all unusual for me to find him watching a boxing match on TV, while simultaneously performing full side splits, reading a book in one hand and pumping the dumbell up and down with the other. Bruce was a big believer in forearm training to improve his gripping and punching power. He was a forearm fanatic, if ever anyone came out with a new forearm course, Bruce would have to get it." George Lee - "He used to send me all of these designs for exercise equipment and I'd build them according to his specs. However I wasn't altogether foolish, I knew that if Bruce was going to use it, it must be effective, so I'd build one to send to him and another for me to use at home." Bob Wall - "Bruce had the biggest forearms proportionate to anybody's body that I've ever seen. I mean, his forearms were huge. He had incredibly powerful wrists and fingers, his arms were just extraordinary". Van Williams (Green Hornet) - "Me and Bruce used to have these wrist wrestling contests. The two combatants arms are fully extended with the aim of twisting the opponent's wrist in a counter-clockwise direction to win. I was the only known person to best Bruce at this and he used to get really mad at that. But it was simply a matter of weight ratios, I outweighed him by damn near 40lbs. Still, Bruce had a pair of the biggest forearms I've ever seen". Herb Jackson - "Bruce used to beat all other comers at this type of wrist wrestling and even joked that he wanted to be world champion at it". Taki Kimura - "If you ever grabbed hold of Bruce's forearm, it was like getting hold of a baseball bat". Danny Inosanto - "Bruce was so obsessed with strengthening his forearms that he used to train them every day. He said "The forearm muscle was very, very dense, so you had to pump that muscle every day to make it stronger". Van Williams - "Bruce used to pack up Linda and Brandon and drive over to visit my wife and me at the weekends. He'd always bring with him some new gadget that he'd designed to build this or that part of the body. He was always working out and never smoked or drank. He was a real clean-cut, educated and wonderful person. I've got to admit that when I last saw him, which was a month or so before his death, he was looking great, his physique was looking as hard as a rock. Bruce had great respect for me and as a joke he placed a sticker in the back window of his automobile that read, "This car is protected by the Green Hornet". Mito Uhera - "Bruce always felt that if your stomach wasn't developed, then you had no business doing any hard sparring". Linda Lee - "He was a fanatic about ab training, he was always doing sit ups, crunches, roman chair movements, leg raises and V-ups". Chuck Norris - "I remember visiting the Lee household and seeing Bruce bouncing his little boy, Brandon, on his abdomen while simultaneously performing leg raises and dumbell flyes." Herb Jackson - "He did a lot of sit ups to develop that fantastic abdomen. He told me "The proper way of doing sit ups isn't just to go up and down but to curl yourself up, like rolling up a roll of paper, doing them this way effectively isolates the abdominal muscles". He would also perform sit ups where he'd twist an elbow to the opposite knee when he rolled himself up". Bolo Yeung - "Bruce had devised a particularly difficult exercise that he called "The Flag". While lying on a bench, he would grasp the uprights attached to the bench with both hands and raise himself off the bench, supported only by his shoulders. Then with his knees locked straight and his lower back raised off the bench, he'd perform leg raises. He was able to keep himself perfectly horizontal in midair. He was incredible, in 100 years there will never be another like him". Linda Lee - "Bruce's waist measurement certainly benefited from all of the attention he paid to his ab program. At it's largest, his waist was 28 inches. At it's smallest, his waist measured under 26 inches". Bob Wall - "Bruce was pretty much of a five mile runner, but then Bruce was one of those guys who just challenged the heck out of himself. He ran backwards, he ran wind sprints where he'd run a mile, walk a mile, run a mile. Whenever I ran with Bruce, it was always a different kind of run. Bruce was one of those total athletes. It wasn't easy training with him. He pushed you beyond where you wanted to go and then some". Karreem Abdul Jabbar - "I used to run with him up and down Roscamore Road in Bel Air when we trained together during the summer of 1970. It was a very hilly terrain, which Bruce loved, and we'd do that at the beginning of each of our workouts". Mito Uhera - "He'd ride a stationary bike for 45 minutes straight (10 Miles) until the sweat would form in pools on the floor beneath him." Herb Jackson - "Bruce would wear a Weider Waist Shaper (a type of sauna belt) when riding his stationary bike. It was all black and made out of neoprene. He'd put it on before getting on the stationary bike. Then he'd turn the resistance up on it. He'd pedal the hell out of the bike. Sweat would pour out of him. He'd ride that bike for a series of 10 minute sessions. He felt that the sauna belt focused the heat onto his stomach and helped keep the fat off. Now maybe it worked and maybe it didn't, but you'd be hard pressed to find any fat anywhere on his body". Danny Inosanto - "Bruce would be constantly reading through the muscle magazines and looking for new products that would help make him leaner. If he found such an item, he'd read all about it, order it, and then try it out to see if the claims made for it were true or not. If he found that it wasn't all it was cracked up to be, he'd discard it and try something else. He was forever experimenting". Bob Wall - "Every room of his house in Hong Kong had some kind of workout equipment in it, which he'd use whenever the mood overtook him. His garage, well he never had a car in his garage because it was always filled with equipment. He had a complete Marcy gym that was located just off the kitchen. Everywhere he went, even in his office, he had barbells and dumbbells. He literally trained all the time. His bodybuilding system consisted of lifting weights on a two days on, two days off type of program. However I also know that he changed things around a lot. Generally, his program consisted of three sets per exercise and usually about 15 reps. He was doing a lot of cable work at the time, when he'd pull one way and then the other way, he was into angles and he'd never do the exact same angle twice in a single workout. He was always trying to do things in a slightly different way". Ted Wong - "Bruce would do a lot of different types of sit ups and bench presses. He was also using a technique like the Weider Heavy/Light Principle, working up to 160lbs in the bench press for three sets of 10 on his heavy days and then repping out for 20-30 reps with 100lbs on his light days. Bruce experimented successfully with partial reps, movements performed in only the strongest motion. He liked the fact that they were very explosive, sometimes he would do the bench press, using just the last 3 inches of the range of motion. It was the same range in which he would do some of his isometric exercises". Linda Lee - "Bruce's physique reached its absolute peak during the later part of 1971. I think his physique looked just as good in '73, but he had been working really hard from '72 on. It was just one movie after another when we lived in Hong Kong. So he was having less time to do all the training he would have liked to". Dorian Yates (Mr Olympia) - "He used to do that thing where he'd spread his scapulas and then tense every muscle in his body, he had an incredible physique". Jhoon Rhee - "You could show him a tremendously difficult technique that took years to perfect and the next time you saw him, he would do it better than you". James Coburn - "Bruce and I were training out on my patio one day, we were using this giant bag for side kicks, I guess it weighed about 150lbs. Bruce looked at it and just went Bang, it shot up out into the lawn about 15ft in the air, it then busted in the middle. It was filled with little bits and pieces of rag, we were picking up bits of rag for months". Danny Inosanto - "Bruce told me to come along with him one day to Joe Weider's store in Santa Monica to help him buy a 110lb cast iron weight set for his son Brandon. I thought this was an odd gift since Brandon was only 5 years old. Bruce bought this beautiful Weider barbell/dumbell set from Joe's store, and when we pulled into my driveway, he said "I'm just joking, Dan. I bought this for you". Michael Gutierrez - "Bruce Lee is very hot these days. So hot in fact, that a 8x10 sheet of paper that Bruce wrote on and signed in 1969 recently went for a cool $29,000 at the Bruce Lee Estate Auction in Beverly Hills last August". Interview mit Jesse Glover – dem ersten Schüler Lee’s Was ist Bruce Lees Jeet Kune Do wirklich? Um diese Frage zu klären, war der Wing Tsun- und Eskrima Lehrer Sifu Keith R. Kernspecht 1979 nach Amerika zu Bruce Lees Schülern geflogen. Bruce Lees 1. Assistent und kampfstärkster Schüler, der 100 Kg schwere Jesse Glover aus Seattle, erwiderte jetzt den Besuch des deutschen Bundestrainers und war monatelang sein Gast und Übungspartner. Zusammen mit Keith Kernspecht besuchte er das europäische Wing Tsun-Hauptquartier in Heidelberg sowie die EWTO-Gruppen Saarbrücken Nürnberg und Hannover, wo er die Gelegenheit nutzte, seinen von Bruce Lee erlernten Stil vorzuführen. Bis auf eine Handvoll Techniken besteht Jesses Repertoir aus Wing Chun-Kampfbewegungen. Ist es also doch noch Wing Chun? Vielleicht eine Art modifiziertes Wing Chun, ein besonderer Wing Chun-Stil? Hier gehen die Auffassungen und Definitionen ausseinander. Jesse selbst glaubt, daß sich seine Methode sehr weit vom klassischen Wing Chun entfernt habe, räumte aber ein, daß der größte Teil seiner Techniken aus dem Wing Chun stamme. Andererseits war ihm das klassische Wing Chun nicht bekannt. Erst Sifu Kernspecht war in der Lage ihm zu bestätigen, daß seines Erachtens die Techniken zwar teilweise nach persönlichen Kriterien verändert waren, aber durchaus noch Wing Chun genannt werden könnten. Zu den Wing Chun Techniken hinzugekommen sind im Wesentlichen: ein Faustrückenschlag aus dem Gottesanbeter-Stil, ein Fauststoß und zwei Tritte aus dem Choy Li Fat und anderen Stilen, sowie ein extrem starker Fauststoß mit Schritt, der eine Kombination dem Wing Chun-Stoß und Jack Dempseys Boxtechnik darstellt. Wing Chun genießt den Ruf, ein sehr praktisches Kampfsystem zu sein, das auf alles Überflüssige, auf alle Schnörkel verzichtet. Bruce Lee ist offensichtlich noch einen Schritt weiter gegangen, er hat die Wing Chun-Techniken nochmals gesiebt und nur das knappe Dutznd Techniken übernommen, das sich in einem Minimum an Zeit erlernen und mit Erfolg anwenden läßt. Diese Wing Chun- Techniken hat er zur Basis seines Jeet Kune Do gemacht. Daß bei dieser Spezialisierung auf höchste Funktionalität natürlich Begriffe wie Kunst, Tradition, Philosophie des Gung Fu auf der Strecke bleiben mußten, werden einige als Vorteil, andere als Nachteil ansehen. Aber um diese Dinge geht es offensichtlich nicht. Jesses Hauptanliegen ist ausschließlich die absolute Wirksamkeit im Kampf. "Ali war der beste Boxer der Welt, obwohl er nie asiatische Philosophie usw. in sein Training einbezog", sagte er mehrfach . Wir interviewten Jesse Glover für die Leser der Karate-Revue. Karate Revue.: Wie lange haben Sie mit Bruce Lee trainiert ? Jesse Glover: Ca . 4-5 Jahre. Wir waren Schulkameraden und wohnten nur wenige Straßen voneinander entfernt in Seattle. Bruce Lee war ein Fanatiker, wir haben täglich stundenlang trainiert, oft bis bis acht Stunden jeden Tag. Wir übten auf dem Weg zur Schule, in den Pausen, auf dem Nachhauseweg, nachmittags, abends und nachts. Bruce konnte keine Minute untätig sein, stets trainierte er seinen Griff mit Bällen, die er zusammendrücke, härtete seine Hände oder übte seine Muskeln isometrisch. KR: Wie hat Bruce Lee trainiert? Welche Techniken bevorzugte er? JG: Bruce pflegte bei jedem Training die Siu Lim Tau aus dem Wing Chun Gung Fu-Stil 50 mal zu üben, dann 500-1000 Kettenfauststößen, Angriffsschritte mit Faust und Fingerstößen, Kombinationen von Hand und Fuß. Seine Holzpuppe diente ihm als Trainingspartner, wenn ich nicht zur Hand war. 80 % von Bruce Lees Techniken kamen von seinem bevorzugten Gung Fu-Stil, dem Wing Chun, das er in Yip Mans Schule erlernte. Den Rest entnahm er aus anderen Kampfstilen. KR: Praktizierte Bruce Lee auch die hohen Tritte Sprünge und Schreie , die wir aus seinem Filmen kennen ? JG: Nein, die haben wir nie bei ihm gesehen. Er verbot uns sogar hohe Tritte im Kampf anzuwenden, da man dabei selbst in Gefahr geraten kann. Man steht auf einem Bein, die Genitalien und das Standbein sind den Tritten des Gegners ausgesetzt. Bei Herausforderungen sah ich Bruce ausschließlich Wing Chun-Kettenfauststöße, Faustrückenschläge und sehr tiefe Tritte anwenden, zum Schienbein oder zum Knie. Nur einmal sah ich ihm zum Kopf treten, als sein Herausforderer von den Kettenfauststößen zu Boden gegangen war. KR: Das klingt nicht sehr sportlich. JG: Was wir machen, hat mit Sport wenig zu tun, bei uns geht es um reine Selbstverteidigung. Wir suchen den Kampf nicht und gehen jedem Streit aus dem Wege. Unsere Kampfmethode ist nur unser letztes Mittel, um uns zu schützen. Wir laufen nicht durch die Gegend und geben mit unseren Kenntnissen an. Viele meiner Schüler trainieren vielleicht schon seit vielen Jahren und niemand in ihrem Freundeskreis weiß, daß sie Gung Fu trainieren. KR: Weshalb wollten Sie von Bruce Lee Gung Fu erlernen? JG: Ich wollte kämpfen lernen, um machen zu können, was ich wollte, um durch jede Straße gehen zu können, um mich nicht fürchten zu müssen. KR: Und was ist jetzt ihr Grund, um weiterzutrainieren? Wir nehmen doch an, daß sich ihr Motiv nach 20 Jahren Training verändert hat. JG: Natürlich,die Ziele von damals sind anderen gewichen. Eigentlich trainiere ich auch gar nicht mehr. Zumindest nicht mehr in dem Maße wie früher. Ich habe nur noch zwei Schüler, wenn ich mit denen fertig bin, werde ich nicht weiter unterrichten. KR: Haben Sie denn nicht die Absicht, in Deutschland Schulen zu eröffnen, Kurse durchzuführen? Weshalb sind sie dann nach Deutschland gekommen? JG: Mein Freund, Keith Kernspecht, hat mich und Dennis (Jesses Freund und Schüler) eingeladen weil er den Europäern zeigen wollte, was Bruce Lee wirklich machte. Ich habe einen normalen Beruf, ich bin Dachdecker, der mich hinreichend ernährt und mir Zeit für meine Interessen läßt. Es gibt auf der Welt noch manche Dinge, die nichts mit Kämpfen zu tun haben. KR: Weshalb hat Bruce Lee in seinen Filmen Techniken vorgeführt, die er im Grunde für unwirksam hielt? JG: Nun, Tritte und Sprünge sind keineswegs unwirksam. Wenn ein sehr schneller Spezialist sie jahrelang trainiert hat, kann er sicherlich damit Erfolg haben, aber Bruce ging es um die Methode, die es dem Durchschnittsmenschen ermöglicht sich sicher zu verteidigen. Ich kann es jedem beibringen, sich mit Fauststößen usw. zu verteidigen. Aber nur einer unter Tausend wird es lernen können, sich mit hohen Tritten und Sprüngen ebenso sicher verteidigen zu können. Bruce Lee war so schnell, daß er buchstäblich alles im Kampf machen konnte. Er konnte den Gegner treffen, ohne daß dieser eine Abwehrbewegung machen konnte. In all den Jahren konnte ich Bruce nicht einmal treffen, wenn er es nicht wollte. Aber Bruce war ein Ausnahmeathlet, er ist nur zu vergleichen mit dem besten Fechter der Welt, der seinen Gegner trifft, bevor dieser seine Waffe zur Abwehr heben kann. Weshalb Bruce spektakuläre Tritte und Sprünge in seinen Filmen gezeigt hat? Manchmal denke ich: aus Rache. Während bei uns in der Stadt die Karate-Lehrer Hunderte von Schülern hatten, konnte Bruce nie mehr als 30, 40 Schüler bekommen. Denn Bruce unterrichtete nur direkte, praktische Kampftechniken. Die Leute wollte aber hohe Sprünge, artistische Tritte, Zerschlagen von Brettern usw. In seinen Filmen hat Bruce ihnen all dies und noch mehr gegeben. Wenn er die Fans sehen würde, wie sie Drehsprünge üben und schrille Tierschreie ausstoßen, würde er sich wahrscheinlich köstlich amüsieren. KR: Was halten Sie von den Büchern, die über Bruce Lee herausgebracht wurden? JG: Die meisten Autoren schienen Bruce Lee nicht wirklich zu kennen, sie nahmen ein paar allgemein bekannte Tatsachen, einige allgemein zugängliche Fotos und bauten eine Geschichte darum. Aber wenig Richtiges wurde über Bruces Persönlichkeit gesagt. Sogar das Buch von seiner Witwe Linda enthält Unrichtigkeiten: Bruce Lee war niemals ein Freund des Karate-Mannes, den er in Seattle im Kampf besiegte, und als der Privatstunden wollte, lehnte Bruce ab. Ebenfalls stimmt es nicht, daß James Yimm Lee mit Bruce zusammen war, als Bruce zum ersten Mal nach Amerika kam. In Wirklichkeit traf Bruce James Lee erst 1962. Auch die Buchserie über "Bruce Lees Kampfstil", in der Bruce sogar mit Mito Uyehara als Autor angegeben ist, schadet Bruce mehr als daß sie seine wahren Techniken aufzeigt. KR: Gerade was das letztgenannte Buch betrifft, werfen manche Leute Bruce Lee vor, ein Plagiator zu sein, das heißt in diesem Falle von der Serie "Praktisches Karate" von Masatoshi Nakayama die Fotos einfach nachgestellt zu haben. Wir haben das überprüft, viele Sequenzen sind tatsächlich identisch. JG: Bruce Lee hatte nie vor, diese nach seinem Tode aus seinem privaten Foto-Album veröffentlichten Fotos, in Buchform herauszubringen. Möglicherweise hat er wirklich Fotos nachgestellt, aber nur zum privaten Spaß. Fest steht, daß er kaum eine der gezeigten Techniken im Kampf verwandt hätte. KR: Wie steht es mit Bruce Lees "Tao of Jeet Kune Do"? JG: Das ist bestenfalls ein schlechter Scherz auf Kosten eines großen Kampfkünstlers. Es wäre besser gewesen, wenn man es nie herausgegeben hätte. Ich fürchte, daß die wertvollsten Notizen von Bruce nach seinem Tode von dem Herausgeber übersehen wurden. Das meiste davon sind nur Erinnerungshilfen, die nur für Bruce bestimmt waren. So hatte er interessante Techniken aus anderen Büchern (Boxen, Ringen, Jiu-Jitsu usw.) für sich abgezeichnet. Aber diese Notizen waren nie zur Veröffentlichung bestimmt. Die Herausgeber haben sie einfach auf den Markt geworfen und sich damit sogar eine Plagiats-Klage eingehandelt. Vor allem aber haben sie Bruce einen schlechten Dienst erwiesen. Das Beste was man über dieses Buch sagen kann ist, daß es eine schlechte Interpretation von Bruces persönlichen Aufzeichnungen ist. Hätte Bruce selbst so ein Buch geschrieben, würde es kaum eine der gezeigten Techniken enthalten haben. Wenige der Techniken helfen dem Anfänger, ein gutes Fundament zu erhalten. Das einzige Buch, das Bruce selber schrieb und wirklich wollte, ist sein "Chinese Gung Fu - The Philosophical Art of Self-Defense", das er mit uns 1963 in Seattle machte. KR: Was halten denn Sie persönlich von Leuten wie z.B. Bill Wallace? JG: Er ist ein Spezialist, der auf seinem Gebiet Hervorragendes leistet. Er hat sich auf ein Bein, auf einen Tritt spezialisiert. Wir sind auf Handtechniken spezialisiert. Jeder soll das machen, was er will. KR: Es gab mal Gerüchte, Bruce Lee sollte gegen Ali antreten... JG: Davon weiß ich nichts, aber ich hätte meinen letzten Cent auf Bruce gesetzt. Er war ein Phänomen. Nie wieder habe ich jemanden gesehen, der so schnell war. Es gibt viele Leute in den Kampfkünsten, die schnell sind. Aber die meisten sind schwach, ob sie treffen oder nicht, macht wenig Unterschied. Aber Bruce hatte bei seiner Schnelligkeit die Kraft eines Weltranggewichthebers. KR: Ja, aber manche sagen, er war sicher der beste Kämpfer seiner Zeit, aber nur in seiner Gewichtsklasse. JG: Quatsch. Wer das sagt, hat nicht vor seinen Fäusten gestanden. KR: Hat Bruce Lee jemals an Wettkämpfen teilgenommen? JG: Nein, wenn man von der Boxmeisterschaft in Hong Kong absieht, die er mit reinen Wing Chun Techniken gewann. Bruce wollte nie an Sportwettkämpfen teilnehmen, weil er sich dann dem Urteil eines Schiedsrichters hätte unterwerfen müssen. Mit Recht zweifelte Bruce aber daran, daß der kompetent genug sein würde, seine schnellen Angriffe überhaupt sicher zu erkennen. Damals gab es noch kein Vollkontakt und wenige wären verrückt genug gewesen, sich auf so etwas mit Bruce einzulassen. KR: Wie stehen sie persönlich zum Vollkontakt ? JG: Hier gilt ähnliches wie beim Boxen.Wer Gehirnschäden in Kauf nehmen will, soll es machen. Mit Sicherheit ist es nicht für jeden das Richtige. Wir betreiben eine Methode die von jedem praktizierbar ist, und zwar ohne zu großes Risiko. Natürlich sind Leute, die im Training treffen und getroffen werden auf den Ernstfall besser vorbereitet als solche, die sich in fünf Jahren Training nicht einmal berühren. Diese gehen häufig beim ersten richtigen Treffer schon vor Schreck K.O. KR: Nach welchen Gesichtspunkten hat Bruce Lee seine Schüler ausgesucht? JG: Eigentlich gar nicht selber, zumindest am Anfang nicht. Ich war sein erster Schüler überhaupt. Bruce war noch sehr schüchtern. So habe ich ihm die ersten Schüler vorgestellt: Ed Hart, Leroy Garcia, Taky Kimura. Und dann haben die nächsten Schüler wieder neue Interessenten vorgeschlagen. Aber eines kann man sagen, die meisten Schüler waren ausgesprochen kräftig und wogen an die 90 kg. Viele waren schon in den Kampfkünsten erfahren, hatten Judo, Boxen oder Karate oder andere Gung Fu-Stile betrieben. KR: Wir haben gelesen, Sie waren ein Top-Judokämpfer, der sich einige Titel geholt hat. Hatten Sie eine Graduierung im Judo ? JG: Das war in den frühen 60er Jahren. Ich hatte das Glück, zwei amerikanische Meister als Lehrer zu haben. Ich war damals 2. Dan, habe mich dann aber ganz auf Gung Fu geworfen, aber einige Judo-Techniken weiter verwandt. KR: Sie waren Bruce Lees erster Schüler, sein erster Assistent und wie uns andere Bruce Lee-Schüler bestätigen, sein kampfstärkster Mann. Wie beurteilen Sie die weitere Entwicklung des Jeet Kune Do? JG: Jeet Kune Do ist tot. Bruce war Jeet Kune Do. Jeet Kune Do (JKD) ist kein Stil, sondern die Bezeichnung für das, was Bruce gemacht hat. Jeet Kune Do ist mit ihm gestorben. Keiner seiner Schüler kann Jeet Kune Do, Bruce war uns allen soweit voraus. Keiner konnte mit ihm Schritt halten. Wir haben eine vage Vorstellung davon, wie weit Bruce vorgestoßen war, aber wir können es nicht nachvollziehen, denn wir sind nicht Bruce Lee. Deshalb nenne ich meine Methode auch nicht Jeet Kune Do, sondern einfach "Non-Classical Gung Fu". Andere Bruce Lee Schüler nennen es vielleicht Ving Tsun oder Wing Chun, denn 80% aller Techniken stammen daher. Andere nennen es chinesisches Boxen. Viele seiner Schüler sind ganz davon abgegangen und praktizieren wieder das, was sie machten, bevor sie von Bruce lernten. Sie machen wieder Tai Chi, Eskrima, Kontakt-Karate, Hsing-I-Gung Fu u.a. KR: Wie kann jemand so etwas tun ? JG: Seine ersten Schüler trainierte Bruce sehr hart. Wir waren auch nicht so sehr seine Schüler, sondern vor allem seine Jugendfreunde, zu uns war er noch sehr offen, er erklärte alles und hatte keine Geheimnisse. Aber später erkannte Bruce die Gefahr, daß einer seiner körperlich stärkeren Schüler ihm überlegen werden könnte, wenn er technisch ein entsprechendes Niveau erreicht. Diese Furcht war allerdings unbegründet. Er begann mehr und mehr seine Techniken zu verschleiern, nicht mehr die Basis seiner Methode: die Wing Chun-Techniken, das Chi Sau, dem er in Wirklichkeit größte Bedeutung beimaß. Er persönlich hatte dieses Fundament schon verlassen und seine Technik war zu einem ausgefeilten Endprodukt geworden. Diese Endprodukt unterrichtete er nun. Aber er zeigte den Schülern nicht mehr den beschwerlichen Weg zu dieser Spitzenleistung, die er in jahrelanger Arbeit erreicht hatte: Täglich 50 mal Siu Lim Tau-Form, Chi Sau-Training, Krafttraining nach der Overload-Methode. Die Schüler, die nur letzte Phase von Bruces Entwicklung vor sich sahen, glaubten, sie könnten werden wie er, wenn sie nur die gleichen Techniken praktizieren. Aber sie hatten keine Chance, denn erstens fehlte ihnen das Fundament und zweitens verfügten sie nicht annähernd über Bruce angeborene und antrainierte Schnelligkeit. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt veränderte Bruce seinen Unterricht radikal, er führte das chinesische Schüler/Lehrer-Verhältnis ein, das Abstand bedeutet, aber schlimmer noch, er forderte die Schüler nicht mehr, die Hautabschürfungen und blauen Flecken wurden seltener, und er unterrichtete nicht mehr die praktischen, direkten Techniken, die er mit mir aber immer noch außerhalb der Klasse übte. Kurz, er unterrichtete Techniken, die spektakulärer waren, an deren absolute Wirksamkeit er aber selbst nicht glaubte, wie er mir privat stets versicherte : "Aber die Leute wollen das ja, also gebe ich es ihnen: Show statt Wirksamkeit!". Das war der Grund, weshalb ich nicht mehr am offiziellen Schulunterricht teilnahm. Mir ging es wie jemand, dem man die Wirkung einer Magnum gezeigt hat, und dann eine Luftpistole in die Hand drückt, mit der er zufrieden sein soll. Ich habe danach nur noch privat mit Bruce trainiert, dies war vielleicht mein Glück, denn er hatte auch später keine Bedenken, mir seine Überlegungen mitzuteilen und seine neuen Techniken an mir auszuprobieren. KR: Wir schließen daraus, daß Ihre Techniken nicht mit denen der anderen Bruce Lee-Schüler übereinstimmen? JG: Ich würde sagen, was ich mache ist eher grundverschieden. Ich unterrichte, was ich gelernt habe, sehr direkte, starke aggressive Techniken, die einen Kampf sehr schnell entscheiden. Meine Methode hat nichts Hübsches, Spektakuläres. KR: Was würden Sie jemand empfehlen, der Bruce Lee nacheifern will? Wo gibt es Jeet Kune Do-Unterricht oder wie immer man es nennen will? JG: Wer das wirklich will, muß trainieren wie Bruce. Er sollte eine Wing Chun-Schule aufsuchen und von Anfang bis Ende alles lernen, was es da zu lernen gibt. Nach Beendigung seiner Lehrzeit wird er wissen welche Techniken ihm besonders liegen, daß heißt, er wird sich natürlicherweise spezialisieren und seine Techniken auf seine persönlichen Bedürfnissen hin anpassen. Findet er noch dazu einen Lehrer, der nicht nur stur klassisches Wing Chun vertritt, sondern ohne Scheuklappen nach links und rechts geguckt hat, kann dieser ihm sehr helfen. Er wird dann zu einem freien Stil gefunden haben, in dem er sich delbst ausdrücken kann. Daß dieser Prozeß Jahre dauert, versteht sich von selbst. "WARM MARBLE" The Lethal Physique of Bruce Lee By John Little Introduction by Mike Mentzer -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It is absolutely amazing how much of an impact that Bruce Lee's strength and physical development have had on athletes, bodybuilders and average men all over the face of the globe. As a young boy in high school, I can clearly recall all of the talk among my friends about the great Bruce Lee; they all were intimately familiar with Bruce's films; and they would discuss not just his epochal martial arts skills, but, also, his incredible strength and lean, shredded physique. As Mr. Little reports in his article, even such a personage as Joe Weider remarked on the astounding muscular refinement and definition of Lee's physique, especially the master's abs. As Mr. Little also explains, Bruce Lee's physique had a remarkable influence on some of today's top physique champs. Bodybuilding luminaries, including Lou Ferrigno, Lee Haney, Dorian Yates, Rachel Mclish, Lenda Murray, Flex Wheeler and Shawn Ray have all spoken on record concerning the enormous impact the physique of Bruce Lee had on them. Why? Why would the physique of the mighty mite, never massively developed along the lines of the bodybuilding greats I just enumerated, but described by some "as the most defined physique in the world." I leave that unanswered, as author, John Little, will provide an incisive, eloquent answer... Subsections in the article will titillate the legion of existing Lee fanatics, and whet the appetite of those for whom this article will serve as their initial introduction to the subject. For instance, Functional Strength, Unbelievable Strength, A Battle in San Fransisco, The Bodybuilding Connection and The Routine, will rivet the reader's focus such that he will finish this article in one reading, and prompt him to want to re-read it and re-re-read it. I've been extremely impressed over the years as to how many bodybuilders are also highly trained martial artists. In fact, over the years I having personally supervised the training of many martial artists, with many of my phone clients already being rabid Lee fans, and martial artists seeking the most efficient manner of training for strength and speed; which was the goal of Lee's training. Also, I receive more e-mails, letters and phone calls from martial artists than any other type of athlete. This I believe follows from Lee's well known concern with weight training to develop efficiency and strength. I am extremely proud to say that one of my best friends, for the past 22 years, wrote this article, which is excerpted from one of the 11 books he's written on Bruce Lee. I first met John Little at Eaton's department store in Toronto where Arnold, Franco and I had made an appearance for Weider and the IFBB, in 1979. We hit it off immediately, as John was philosophically oriented, along with having a passionate interest in bodybuilding. After that initial meeting, we met at Lou Hollozi's gym in Toronto in 1980, where I conducted a seminar; and, with that, John and I further cemented our friendship. Subsequently, John made a number of trips to Los Angeles, where he'd usually stay with me in my apartment in West Hollywood. His primary purpose in traveling to southern California was to pursue the subjects of those he wrote books about, including Steve Reeves and Lou Ferrigno. It was finally, in 1992, that Joe Weider brought John to Los Angeles to write for Flex. This only lasted three years, as John was more interested in writing freely about his passion, namely - philosophy, martial arts, the philosophy of Bruce Lee's, who, too, was a fervent student of philosophy, his personal library packed with philosophy books that extended from the floor to the ceiling and spanned the length of the room. His quest for the truth saw him avidly studying philosophies ranging from that of Krishnamurti's to our most revered, Ayn Rand. Bruce Lee's life was most interesting as he rose from a starving, poor boy in Hong Kong to the world's most celebrated movie star in Hollywood, having a greater impact on more people than that of Elvis Presley's, James Dean's and Marilyn Monroe's combined! I trust that you, dear reader, will gain much knowledge from John Little's article, along with the added inspiration that will act to have you approach your own training with greater inspiration and motivation than ever before. Above all else, I ardently desire that you will read John Little's superlative article mostly for the sheer pleasure of it. Mike Mentzer -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "If you're talking about combat -- as it is -- well then, baby you'd better train every part of your body!" -- Bruce Lee (from the video, Bruce Lee: The Lost Interview) There's an anecdote that has endured some 28 years concerning the texture of the muscles that adorned the physique of the late martial arts pioneer/philosopher, Bruce Lee. It concerns a lady named Ann Clouse, the wife of Robert Clouse, the man who directed Lee's last film Enter the Dragon for Warner Bros. It seems that Clouse's wife had ventured onto the set of the film and was mesmerized by Lee's incredible physique as he went through his paces choreographing the fight scenes for the film, stripped to the waist under the hot and humid Hong Kong sun. In between takes, Ann approached the young superstar and asked if she could "feel his biceps." "Sure," Lee responded -- it was a request he'd received on numerous occasions -- tensing his arm and inviting her to check it out for herself. "My God!" she exclaimed, drawing her hand back instantly, "It's like feeling warm marble!" It's fascinating that almost three decades later, people are still talking about the body of Bruce Lee -- although it is by no means surprising. The Lee physique, once described by no less an authority on such matters than bodybuilding magnate Joe Weider as "the most defined body I've ever seen!" has attracted (much like the man's martial art and philosophy) a following that not only rivals but exceeds those of Elvis Presley, James Dean and Marilyn Monroe -- combined! Certainly his following exceeds that of any bodybuilder of a similar vintage. And even more fascinating is the fact that almost everyone gets something different out of Bruce Lee -- martial artists revere his physical dexterity, power, speed and the genius he displayed in bringing science to bear on the world of martial arts; moviegoers are impressed with the man's screen presence and animal magnetism, along with the fact that he single-handedly created a new genre of action film thus opening the door to the Stallones, Schwarzeneggers and Jackie Chans who were to follow in his footsteps; philosophers are impressed with Lee's ability to bridge the philosophical chasm separating East and the West and to synthesize the best aspects of both cultures. But there exists another pocket of humanity that sees in Lee something else -- although not entirely unrelated -- the bodybuilders. Bodybuilders, young and old, know from one quick glance at Lee's physique exactly how much labor went into its creation -- and they are, one and all, very impressed. Ironically, bodybuilding luminaries of no less stature than Flex Wheeler, Shawn Ray, Rachel McClish, Lou Ferrigno, Lee Haney, Lenda Murray and former Mr. Olympia, Dorian Yates -- that is to say, the best in the business - have all spoken on the record regarding the impact the physique of Bruce Lee had on their bodybuilding careers. "How could this be?" I can hear you ask, perhaps somewhat incredulously. After all, Lee was only 5'7" tall and checked in at a weight that fluctuated between 126 to 145 pounds! What could a behemoth like Dorian Yates, for example, see in Bruce Lee's physique that would give him grounds for any form of inspiration? The answer, in a word, would be quality. There has seldom been seen - this side of a jungle cat -- the incredible sinewy and ripped-to-the-bone quality of muscle displayed by Bruce Lee. He was ripped in places that bodybuilders are just now (28 years later) learning they can train. Every muscle group on his body stood out in bold relief from its neighbor -- not simply for show (unlike many bodybuilders) but for function. Lee was, to quote his first student in the United States, Seattle's Jesse Glover, "above all else, concerned with function." Lee's body was not only a thing of immense grace and beauty to watch in action, but it was supremely functional. Leaping eight feet in the air to kick out a light bulb (as evidenced in Lee's office-wrecking scene in the MGM movie Marlow), landing a punch from five feet away in five-hundredths of a second and catching grains of rice -- that he'd thrown into the air -- with chopsticks were things Lee had trained his body (and reflexes) to accomplish. In fact, during his famous "Lost Interview" Lee referred to his approach to training as "the art of expressing the human body." Indeed, perhaps never before has there been such an incredible confluence of physical attributes brought together in the form of one human being -- lightening fast reflexes, supreme flexibility, awesome power, feline grace and muscularity combined in one total -- and very lethal -- package. Furthermore, the Lee physique was balanced and symmetrical and, while not everyone can be said to admire the massive musculature of our Olympians, everyone -- or so it would seem (including the world's greatest bodybuilders) admire the "total package" that was Bruce Lee. Who should have won? Judge for yourself. All of the aforementioned champion bodybuilders have indicated that Bruce Lee was a major influence on their bodybuilding careers, which is no small accomplishment when one considers the fact that Lee never entered a physique contest in his life. Ironically, despite his influence being, felt by the hardest of hard-core bodybuilders, Lee himself was never interested in developing a massive musculature. One of Lee's closest friends and an instructor in Lee's art of Jeet Kune Do, Ted Wong, recalls that "Bruce trained primarily for strength and speed." The physique -- while certainly appreciated by Lee -- came almost as a by-product of such training. According to those who met him, from Hollywood producers to his fellow martial artists, Lee's muscles carried considerable impact. Taky Kimura, one of Lee's closest friends (in fact, the best man at Lee's wedding in 1964) recalls that Lee was never loath to remove his shirt and display the results of his labors in the gym -- often just to see the reactions of those around him. "He had the most incredible set of lats I'd ever seen," recalled Kimura, "and his big joke was to pretend that his thumb was an air hose, which he'd then put in his mouth and pretend to inflate his lats with. He looked like a damn cobra when he did that!" Lee's physique holds up under scrutiny and has survived the passage of time simply because it possessed what many consider to have been the perfect blend of razor-sharp cuts, awesome muscularity, great shape and an almost onion skin definition. The muscles that bulged and rippled across the Lee physique were thick, dense, well-chiseled from their neighbor and, above all, functional. Functional Strength Dan Inosanto, another of Lee's close friends and himself an instructor in Lee's art, adds that Lee was only interested in strength that could readily be converted to power. "I remember once Bruce and I were walking along the beach in Santa Monica, out by where the 'Dungeon' (an old-time bodybuilding gym) used to be," recalls Inosanto, "when all of a sudden this big, huge bodybuilder came walking out of the Dungeon and I said to Bruce, 'Man, look at the arms on that guy!' I'll never forget Bruce's reaction, he said 'Yeah, he's big -- but is he powerful? Can he use that extra muscle efficiently?" Power, according to Lee, lay in an individual's ability to use the strength developed in the gym quickly and efficiently; in other words, power was the measure of how quickly and effectively one could summon and coordinate strength for "real-world" purposes. On this basis, according to those who worked out with Lee from time to time such as martial arts actor Chuck Norris, Bruce Lee -- pound for pound-- might well have been one of the most powerful men in the world. Unbelievable Strength Lee's feats of strength are the stuff of legend; from performing push-ups - on one hand! - or thumbs only pushups, to supporting a 125-pound barbell at arms length in front of him (with elbows locked) for several seconds, or sending individuals (who outweighed him by as much as 100 pounds in some instances) flying through the air and landing some 15 feet away as a result of a punch that Lee delivered from only one-inch away, the power that Bruce Lee could generate -- at a mere bodyweight of 135 pounds -- is absolutely frightening. Not to mention some of his other nifty little habits like thrusting his fingers through full cans of Coca-Cola and sending 300 pound heavy bags slapping against the ceiling with a simple side kick. Strength training -- qua strength training -- was Lee's primary objective with resistance exercise. Later, as we shall soon see, his training evolved into more specialized applications that were beneficial to his specific goals as a martial artist. But before we get to there, let's first take a look at how Lee was first drawn to bodybuilding. Ideals & Possibilities For a number of years, Lee had made a concerted study of exercise physiology and anatomy. Refusing to merely accept tradition for tradition's sake - a stance that made him increasingly unpopular with the majority of his fellow martial artists who had been raised and were now in the process of passing on (without questioning) the various martial traditions of the East -- Lee's background in physiology and kinesiology had imbued him with the ability to discern a useful exercise from an unproductive one and therefore he was able to avoid the obstacle of wasted time in any of his workouts. Lee believed that the student of exercise science should aim at nothing less than physical perfection, with all that it implies in its totality; he should want great strength, great speed, great coordination, exuberant health, and, by no means least, the muscular beauty of form which distinguishes a physically perfect human being. To Lee, the whole secret of success in bodybuilding lay in the principle of progressive resistance, but he also recognized that there was another component that had won a place in the vocabulary of physical culture and that word was persistence. Certainly Lee was nothing if not persistent in his quest to fully explore and express the potential of his body, a physique that not only looked phenomenal on a movie screen but that also possessed a musculature that was geared for function. Given the physiological fact that a stronger muscle is a bigger muscle, it was only natural that Lee would in time come to appreciate the superior health-building benefits of bodybuilding -- but I'm getting ahead of myself. Let us now examine the situation that first caused Lee to appreciate bodybuilding and then we shall focus on what routine he utilized to build the muscles that served him with such tremendous efficiency. While Lee may have been aware of the general benefits to be had from a program of progressive bodybuilding exercises, it took a violent encounter to make him fully cognizant of the merits that a more regular and dedicated approach to bodybuilding could provide. A Battle in San Francisco One evening while Lee was preparing to teach a class to a group of select students in his modest San Francisco kwoon (kung fu school), the door to his school suddenly flew open and in walked a group of Chinese martial artists led by a practitioner who was considered to be their best fighter and the designated leader of the troupe. According to Lee's wife, Linda, who was both present and eight months pregnant with the couple's first child, Brandon, at the time, Lee had on a prior occasion been served with an ornate scroll saying in bold Chinese characters that he had an ultimatum: stop teaching non-Chinese students Gung fu (the Cantonese pronunciation of Kung Fu) or be prepared to fight with San Francisco's top Kung Fu man. Now, the day of reckoning had come. Lee handed the scroll disdainfully back to their leader. "I'll teach whomever I choose," he said calmly. "I don't care what color they are." While Lee's non-racist views are today generally applauded, in San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid 1960s they were tantamount to treason -- at least within the Chinese community. Indeed, teaching Chinese combative "secrets" to non-Chinese races was perceived as the highest form of treason in the martial arts community. By his words and demeanor, Lee had effectively thrown the gauntlet back at the feet of his would-be challenger and, while Lee had many virtues, it is well known among his friends, family and students that patience in suffering fools and their ignorance was not one of them. A fight immediately broke out and, in a matter of seconds, Lee had the previously bold and self-righteous kung fu "expert" running for the nearest exit. Finally, after much legwork, Lee was able to throw his man to the floor and extract a submission from him. In a rage, Lee threw the entire troupe off the premises, cursing them out in Cantonese, en route. However, Lee quickly learned -- to his shock, given that the fight had lasted all of three minutes -- that he had expended a tremendous amount of energy in the altercation. "He was surprised and disappointed at the physical condition he was in," recalled Linda of the occasion. "He'd thought that the fight had lasted way too long and that it was his own lack of proper conditioning that made it such a lengthy set-to. He had felt inordinately winded afterwards." It was this fight more than any other single event that had given Lee sufficient cause to thoroughly investigate alternate avenues of physical conditioning. His conclusion? He would need to develop considerably more strength -- of both his muscles and cardiovascular system -- if he was ever to become the complete martial artist he had envisioned becoming. The Bodybuilding Connection Knowing that the muscle magazines were the only existing source of current health and strength training information, Lee immediately began to subscribe to all of the bodybuilding publications he could find. He ordered bodybuilding courses out of the magazines and tested their claims and theories. He made a habit out of frequenting second-hand bookstores and purchasing books on bodybuilding and strength training, including one written by Eugene Sandow entitled Strength & How to Obtain It -- which was originally published in 1897. Lee's hunger for knowledge in the field of bodybuilding ran so high, that he purchased everything he could get his hands on -- from "hot off the press" courses to back list classics. No price was too high for knowledge, particularly if its application resulted in the acquisition of greater bodily strength, power and physical efficiency. From this point on until his eventual death in July of 1973 (of a cerebral edema), Bruce Lee amassed a tremendous personal library of books on philosophy, martial art and an extensive selection of tomes that dealt extensively with physical fitness, bodybuilding, physiology and weight lifting. Lee would underline certain passages of text that he found particularly meaningful and would constantly jot down thoughts of how this information could be applied to martial art in the margins of the books. "Bruce used to come into his school in L.A.'s Chinatown with an armful of articles from the muscle magazines," recalls Inosanto. "He'd say 'look at this: these bodybuilders all say that they do this in order to increase their strength -- it's a common denominator running throughout all of their writings.' He'd look for consistency in things like that and would compare and eliminate the additional data that he felt was superfluous." The Routine After much research, and with the help of two bodybuilders who were also his close friends and students in the San Francisco Bay area, Lee devised a three-day-per-week bodybuilding program that he felt fit his strengthening and bodybuilding needs perfectly. According to one of these men, Allen Joe, "James Lee and I introduced Bruce to the basic weight training techniques. We used to train with basic exercises like squats, pullovers and curls for about three sets each. Nothing really spectacular but we were just getting him started." This program actually served Lee well from 1965 through until 1970 and fit in perfectly with Lee's own philosophy of getting the maximum results out of the minimum -- or most economical -- expenditure of energy. The every-other-day workout allowed for the often neglected aspect of recovery to take place. Lee coordinated his bodybuilding workouts in such a way so as to insure that they fell on days when he wasn't engaged in either endurance-enhancing or overly strenuous martial art training. The program worked like magic; increasing Lee's bodyweight from an initial 130 pounds to -- at one point -- topping out at just over 165 pounds! According to Glover, however, Lee wasn't particularly pleased with the added mass; "I noticed that he was bigger after he was weight training. There was a time after he went to California that he went up to 165 pounds. But I think it slowed him down because that was real heavy for Bruce. He looked buff like a bodybuilder. And then, later on I saw him and this was all gone. I mean, one thing that Bruce was [about] was function -- and if stuff got in the way, then it had to go. Bruce wanted his weight training to complement what he did in the martial arts. A lot of what Bruce was doing was about being able to maintain arm positions that nobody could violate in a fight. Like, if you take most people who are into bodybuilding or weight training, most of them are interested in simply building up their muscles to a bigger size, particularly the major muscle groups -- not much attention is paid to the connective tissues, like ligament and tendon strength. Well, Bruce's thing was 'let's build up the connectors and we won't worry so much about the size of the muscle.' Again, Bruce was about function." Gearing his training for function, Lee's bodybuilding routine incorporated the three core tenets of total fitness- stretching for flexibility, weight training for strength and cardiovascular activity for his respiratory system -- the original cross-trainer! Bruce Lee's "Lethal Physique" Bodybuilding Program (performed on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays) Exercise Sets Repetitions Clean & Press 2 8 Squats 2 12 Pullovers 2 8 Bench Presses 2 6 Good Mornings 2 8 Barbell Curls 2 8 The Breakdown of the Routine: 1.) Clean & Press: Lee would begin this movement by taking a shoulder-width grip on an Olympic barbell. Bending his knees, he would squat down in front of the resistance and, with a quick snap of his arms and a thrust from his legs, clean the barbell to his chest and stand up. After a brief pause, Lee would then thrust the barbell to arms length overhead, pause briefly, and then lower the barbell back to the top of his chest. After another brief pause, he would lower the barbell back to the floor (the starting position). With absolutely no rest, Lee would then initiate his second repetition of the movement and continue to do so until he had completed eight repetitions. After a very brief rest, so as to take full advantage of the cardio-respiratory benefits as well as the strength-building benefits, Lee would perform a second -- and final -- set. 2.) Squats: This staple of bodybuilding movements was the cornerstone of Bruce Lee's barbell training. He had dozens of articles that he'd clipped out on the mechanics and benefits of squats and he practiced many variations of this exercise. In his routine, however, he performed the exercise in the standard fashion. Resting a barbell across his shoulders, Lee would place his feet approximately shoulder-width apart. Making sure that he was properly balanced, Lee would slowly ascend to a full squat position. With absolutely zero pause in the bottom position, Lee would then immediately return -- using the strength of his hips, glutes, hamstrings, calves and quadriceps -- to the starting position, whereupon he would commence rep number two. Lee would perform 12 repetitions in this movement and, after a short breather, return and re-shoulder the barbell for one more set of 12 reps. 3.) Pullovers: Although there exists no physical evidence that Bruce Lee supersetted barbell pullovers with squats, there is reason to believe that this was case -- if only for the fact that such was the method advocated in the articles he read. Squats were considered a great "overall" muscle builder, whereas pullovers were simply considered a "rib box expander" or "breathing exercise." Consequently, the fashion of incorporating pullovers in the late 1960s and early 1970s was as a "finishing" movement for squats. This being the case, Lee would perform the movement in the standard fashion; i.e., by lying down on his back upon a flat bench and taking a shoulder-width grip on a barbell that he would then proceed to press out to full extension above his chest. From this position, Lee would lower the barbell -- making sure to keep a slight bend in his elbows so as not to strain the elbow joint -- behind his head until it touched the floor ever so slightly and provided a comfortable stretch to his lats. From this fully-extended position, Lee would then slowly reverse the motion through the contraction of his lats, pecs and long-head of the triceps. He would repeat this movement for two sets of eight repetitions. 4.) Bench Presses: Bruce Lee was able to develop an incredible chest musculature. His upper pecs were particularly impressive, bunching and splitting into thousands of fibrous bands. And, as far as his personal training records indicate, the only direct barbell movement he performed to develop his chest was the good old fashioned bench press. Lying down upon a flat bench, and again taking a shoulder-width grip on an Olympic barbell, Lee would press the weight off the support pins to arms length above his chest. From this locked-out position, Lee would then lower the barbell to his chest and, exhaling, press it back up to the fully-locked out (or starting) position. He would repeat this movement for six repetitions and then, after a brief respite, return to the bench for one more set of six reps. 5.) Good Mornings: A word of caution about this exercise. Lee performed this movement to strengthen his lower back. However, one day in early 1970 he loaded up the bar with 135 pounds (his bodyweight at the time) and -- without a warm up -- proceeded to knock off eight repetitions. On his last rep he felt a "pop" and found out later that he had damaged the fourth sacral nerve of his lower back. The result was the Lee had to endure incredible back pain for the remainder of his life. This is not to say that the movement is without merit, just make sure that you perform an adequate warm-up prior to employing, it. Placing a barbell across his shoulders, Lee would place his feet three inches apart (Lee would later confide to Dan Inosanto "You really don't need any weight but the empty bar on your shoulders Dan -- it's more of a limbering movement") and bend over from the waist keeping his hands on the barbell at all times. Lee would bend over until his back was at a 90 degree angle to his hips and then return to the upright position. Lee performed two sets of eight repetitions of this movement. 6.) Barbell Curls: Bruce Lee performed barbell curls not only in his garage gym on Roscomare Avenue in Bel Air, but also in his studio office in Hong Kong. They were a staple or "core" movement in his weight training routine and were also responsible for building a very impressive pair of biceps on Lee -- not to mention incredible pulling power, which he used to such good effect in all of his sparring sessions! To perform this movement properly, Lee would take a comfortable shoulder-width grip on the barbell with his palms facing forwards. Keeping a slight bend in his knees for stabilization purposes, Lee would then contract his biceps and curl the barbell up to a point level with his upper pecs. Pausing briefly in this fully-contracted position, Lee would then slowly lower the barbell back to the starting position. Two sets of eight repetitions of this movement would typically wrap up Lee's bodybuilding routine. Get Mentzer's Latest Book Muscles in Minutes Going Beyond "Routine" According to Inosanto, Lee didn't just train with the above listed exercises. He would also incorporate weight training into his martial art workouts. "Bruce would always shadow box with small weights in his hands and he'd do a drill in which he'd punch for 12 series in a row, 100 punches per series, using a pyramid system of 1,2,3,5,7 and 10-pound weights -- and then he'd reverse the pyramid and go 10, 7, 5, 3, 2, 1 and finally "zero" weight. He had me do this drill with him and -- Man! -- what a burn you'd get in your delts and arms!" It didn't stop there however. When Lee wasn't training with weights in his martial art workouts or during one of his three designated whole-body training sessions, he could be found curling a dumbbell in the office in his house. "He was always using that dumbbell," recalls Linda in looking back on her husband's training habits. "Bruce had the unique ability to be able to several things at once. It wasn't all unusual for me to find him watching a boxing match on TV, simultaneously performing a full side splits, while reading a book in one hand and pumping a dumbbell in the other." Incredible Abs By far the most impressive of all of Lee's bodyparts was his abdominal muscles, which he trained daily. "Bruce always felt that if your stomach wasn't developed, then you had no business sparring," recalls Wong. "He was a fanatic about abdominal training," concurs Linda, "he was always doing sit-ups, crunches, Roman Chair movements, Leg Raises and V-ups." Chuck Norris has gone on record recalling the time that he went to visit the Lee family and seeing Bruce lying on the living room floor bouncing his son Brandon on his abdomen while simultaneously performing dumbbell flyes for his pecs and leg raises for his abs - and watching television to boot! Forearms of Steel In order to improve his gripping and punching power, Lee became an avid devotee of forearm training, While many champion bodybuilders shy away from direct forearm training, Lee made it a point to train his forearms daily. "He was a forearm fanatic," laughs Linda in retrospect. "If ever any b

IP: Logged

chriss

Beiträge: 3
Aus:
Registriert: 05.04.2001

28.03.2004 17:22     Profil von chriss   chriss eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
Forearms of Steel In order to improve his gripping and punching power, Lee became an avid devotee of forearm training, While many champion bodybuilders shy away from direct forearm training, Lee made it a point to train his forearms daily. "He was a forearm fanatic," laughs Linda in retrospect. "If ever any bodybuilder -- such as Bill Pearl -- came out with a forearm course, Bruce would have to get it." Bruce even commissioned an old friend of his from San Francisco, George Lee (no relation) to build him several "Gripping machines" to which Lee would add weight for additional resistance. "He used to send me all of these designs for exercise equipment," recalls George Lee, "and I'd build them according to his specs. However, I wasn't altogether foolish," he says with a laugh, "I knew that if Bruce was going to use it, it must be effective, so I'd build one to send to him and another for me to use at home!" Allen Joe recalls that Lee had a favorite dumbbell exercise that he used to train his forearms with constantly: "Bruce was always working on his forearms. He'd pick up a weight and go to the edge of the sofa and start doing wrist curls while he was watching TV. Then he'd do his abdominal work -- and then he'd return to his forearm training. The dumbbell curl he liked best was a Zottman curl, where you would curl the weight up one side of your body and then you twist it and bring it down on the other side. He'd do that all the time!" Knowledge Is Power For the past seven years I've been hard at work compiling all (and I mean ALL) of Bruce Lee's training programs, notes and annotations on physical training for a book series that, like Lee's training methods, has proved to be constantly evolving (the training material has been presented in the book entitled The Art of Expressing The Human Body, Tuttle Publishing, Boston). And what amazes me after having looked through all of his materials is just how thorough his knowledge of training actually was. Lee collected over 140 books on bodybuilding, weight training, physiology and kinesiology during his lifetime, in addition to well over 2,000 books on philosophy and the martial arts. Lee believed that you could never know "too much" about a subject that could benefit your health and he lived his entire life trying to acquire as much knowledge about health and fitness as he could. Although Lee is no longer with us, his teachings and his example live on. Certainly this is so in the realm of exercise science. Lee epitomized the athletic ideals of diligence, hard work, bearing up under adversity and refusing to short-change either oneself or one's potential. "Low aim is the biggest crime a man can commit," he once told Tae Kwon Do Master, Jhoon Rhee. "Remember, Life is a journey, not a destination." The Roman philosopher Seneca once said that, "Life, if thou knowest how to use it, is long enough." If this is so, then Bruce Lee's life was long enough to be a fulfilling one, perhaps - given what he accomplished and the enduring influence of his example -- it might just be considered one of the more meaningful lives of the twentieth century. And it was Lee's commitment to excellence - and to a principled approach to training - that resulted in the creation of one of the greatest physiques in modern history.

IP: Logged

stolzes Kind

Beiträge: 297
Aus: Aachen
Registriert: 23.08.2003

28.03.2004 17:55     Profil von stolzes Kind   stolzes Kind eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
OH mein Gott ... Junge, das ist hier ein Bodybuilding Forum . Was zur Hölle hat hier irgend eine Kampfsportgurke verloren ?!!? Schick sowas ins Off-Topic !

IP: Logged

lightning

Beiträge: 263
Aus: Braunschweig
Registriert: 12.03.2003

28.03.2004 19:22     Profil von lightning   lightning eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
>Was zur Hölle hat hier irgend eine Kampfsportgurke verloren? Wer lesen kann, ist klar im Vorteil. Ich habe jetzt alles durchgelesen und ich finde, ein ungeheuer informatives Posting von "chriss". Was diese Gurke mit Bodybuilding zu tun hat wird klar, wenn man tatsächlich den ganzen Text liest. Viele interessante Dinge, auch geschichtlich bezüglich des Krafttrainings und in besonderer Weise auch des Bodybuildings. Wen es nicht interessiert, ignorieren. Ist aber tatsächlich relativ interessant, auch für "nicht-Kampfsportler". Gruß lightning

IP: Logged

Garak

Beiträge: 212
Aus: Cardassia Prime
Registriert: 27.12.2003

28.03.2004 19:27     Profil von Garak   Garak eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
wie ich jetzt anfang täglich sit ups zu machen :)

IP: Logged

HARDER

Beiträge: 833
Aus: Rendsburg
Registriert: 26.09.2001

28.03.2004 21:49     Profil von HARDER   HARDER eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
Dank Dir Chriss :daumen:

IP: Logged

Recoil

Beiträge: 53
Aus:
Registriert: 26.01.2004

28.03.2004 22:55     Profil von Recoil   Recoil eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
Eins steht fest: die Leistungen von dem Kerl waren absolut einmalig. Er war dafür geboren (Talent), hatte wahrscheinlich die perfekte Genetik dafür und war auch mental 100% bei der Sache. So Einen gibts vielleicht einmal unter...naja, allen, die es bisher gab. Er ist eben einmalig.

IP: Logged

gozr

Beiträge: 51
Aus:
Registriert: 13.07.2003

28.03.2004 22:56     Profil von gozr   gozr eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
klasse sammlung ! prima infos und auf jedenfall spannend zu lesen. danke :)

IP: Logged

John Kimble

Beiträge: 95
Aus: münchen
Registriert: 08.08.2002

29.03.2004 13:42     Profil von John Kimble   John Kimble eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
fands auch sehr interessant, danke.

IP: Logged

stolzes Kind

Beiträge: 297
Aus: Aachen
Registriert: 23.08.2003

29.03.2004 19:30     Profil von stolzes Kind   stolzes Kind eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
Omg .. demnächst Poste ich den Trainingstipps von Bärbel Schäfer oder Rainer Kallmund - die haben genauso viel mit BB zu tun. Was Bruce Lee an Muskelmasse aufgebaut hat ist ja wohl ein Witz. Jeder Leichtathlet hat mehr Masse als er.

IP: Logged

DancerInTheDark

Beiträge: 1036
Aus: AUT
Registriert: 11.01.2004

29.03.2004 19:33     Profil von DancerInTheDark   DancerInTheDark eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
[quote:810102b355="stolzes Kind"]Omg .. demnächst Poste ich den Trainingstipps von Bärbel Schäfer oder Rainer Kallmund - die haben genauso viel mit BB zu tun. Was Bruce Lee an Muskelmasse aufgebaut hat ist ja wohl ein Witz. Jeder Leichtathlet hat mehr Masse als er.[/quote:810102b355] [quote:810102b355]Er konnte eine 60 Kilo Langhantel per Frontheben nach oben bewegen, und sie 10 Sekunden konstant mit gestreckten Armen vor dem Körper halten, ohne ins Hohlkreuz zu gehen! [/quote:810102b355]

IP: Logged

lightning

Beiträge: 263
Aus: Braunschweig
Registriert: 12.03.2003

29.03.2004 20:07     Profil von lightning   lightning eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
:d_up:

IP: Logged

destructivus

Beiträge: 437
Aus: wiEn3
Registriert: 01.09.2003

29.03.2004 20:41     Profil von destructivus   destructivus eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
worauf ist das stolze kind eigentlich stolz??????? :oje:

IP: Logged

twist.to

Beiträge: 537
Aus: ganz hinten in meinem Kopf
Registriert: 21.01.2004

30.03.2004 01:11     Profil von twist.to   twist.to eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
na auf sich hoffentlich nicht ... nette Sammlung, is mir zuviel ,aber das was ich gelesen habe war interessant zu wissen.

IP: Logged

stolzes Kind

Beiträge: 297
Aus: Aachen
Registriert: 23.08.2003

30.03.2004 13:26     Profil von stolzes Kind   stolzes Kind eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
Hallo ... ich rede von der Masse - schliesslich gehts beim BodyBuilding ( Körper formen) nicht um die Kraft sondern ums Aussehen. Dass Bruce Lee n wahrer "Hengst" war weiss ich selber, nur er hat absolut nichts mit Bodybuilding zu tun. Was er versucht hat war, wie beschrieben, einfach nur seine Kraft zu steigern. Das gleiche machen Gewichtheber oder Leichtathleten auch nur sehn sie dabei halt alle nicht besonders aus. Ich mein , wen interessierts dass er 60 Kg heben konnte wenn er nen 30 cm Arm hat !?! N Bodybuilder wär eher froh wenn er 10 Kg heben kann und dabei n 50 cm Arm hat ..

IP: Logged

~[azn]~dEvIl

Beiträge: 580
Aus: Rostock
Registriert: 12.12.2001

30.03.2004 13:33     Profil von ~[azn]~dEvIl   ~[azn]~dEvIl eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
[quote:b0ce2dffbc="stolzes Kind"]Hallo ... ich rede von der Masse - schliesslich gehts beim BodyBuilding ( Körper formen) nicht um die Kraft sondern ums Aussehen. Dass Bruce Lee n wahrer "Hengst" war weiss ich selber, nur er hat absolut nichts mit Bodybuilding zu tun. Was er versucht hat war, wie beschrieben, einfach nur seine Kraft zu steigern. Das gleiche machen Gewichtheber oder Leichtathleten auch nur sehn sie dabei halt alle nicht besonders aus. Ich mein , wen interessierts dass er 60 Kg heben konnte wenn er nen 30 cm Arm hat !?! N Bodybuilder wär eher froh wenn er 10 Kg heben kann und dabei n 50 cm Arm hat ..[/quote:b0ce2dffbc] blub :silly: beim bodybuilding geht es zwar auch um die körperliche entwicklung, aber darf man sich erst bodybuilder nennen wenn man gewisse ausmasse hat? definitiv nein. bodybuilding ist nicht nur pumpen, sondern auch der lebensstil. bruce lee hatte soviel disziplin wie kein anderer. ausserdem hat niemand gesagt, dass er bodybuilder war oder sein wollte. also ich würde gerne masse gegen mehr kraft eintauschen. und ähm, worauf bist du stolz?!

IP: Logged

stolzes Kind

Beiträge: 297
Aus: Aachen
Registriert: 23.08.2003

30.03.2004 14:00     Profil von stolzes Kind   stolzes Kind eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
Womit verdienen denn die Pros letztendlich ihr Geld !?! Interessiert es irgendeinen von den Kampfrichter wie diszipliniert der Lebensstil der Person auf der Bühne ist ?!! Neee, ganz bestimmt nicht - was zählt ist das äussere Erscheinungsbild. Ob man es nun mit mega diszipliniertem Lebensstil erreicht hat oder indem man sich täglich n Kilo Pommes Rot Weiss reinhaut ist doch absolut nebensächlich. Ich und mit Sicherheit jeder Pro verbindet mit Bodybuilding den Aufbau von Masse und ein geiles Erscheinungsbild - ist klar dass das nicht ohne Disziplin geht , aber wer zur Hölle ist Bruce Lee dass er ein Recht hat hier unter der Rubrik "Bodybuilding allgemein" zu laufen, wenn er wahrscheinlich grad ma 50 kilo auf die Wage gebracht hat ?! Hätte er damals bei einem richtigen BB Wettkampf auf der Bühne gestanden wärn die Zuschauer wahrscheinlich garnicht mehr aus dem Lachen herausgekommen. - Wie diszipliniert er war ist ja wohl absolut nebensächlich.

IP: Logged

clac

Beiträge: 30
Aus: Appen
Registriert: 15.02.2004

30.03.2004 14:20     Profil von clac   clac eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
wie auch immmer ich finde es auf jeden fall gut zu lesen...und auch gut zu wissen

IP: Logged

notorious_nick

Beiträge: 13
Aus: Witten
Registriert: 09.02.2004

30.03.2004 14:27     Profil von notorious_nick   notorious_nick eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
ich find den beitrag 1a! trainiere selber kung fu und der beitrag motiviert mich noch härter zu tainieren. danke dir

IP: Logged

Naked Cowboy

Beiträge: 1636
Aus: Schizophrenien
Registriert: 03.06.2002

30.03.2004 14:38     Profil von Naked Cowboy   Naked Cowboy eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
[quote:a9ca9dfb20="stolzes Kind"] Hätte er damals bei einem richtigen BB Wettkampf auf der Bühne gestanden wärn die Zuschauer wahrscheinlich garnicht mehr aus dem Lachen herausgekommen. - Wie diszipliniert er war ist ja wohl absolut nebensächlich.[/quote:a9ca9dfb20] Hmm, don´t know, dünnes Eis, aber ich könnte mir vorstellen das Bruce (der meiner Meinung nach eher über 60 kg gewogen hat) in der damaligen Zeit (Ende 60er, Anfang 70er) in seiner Gewichtsklasse angetreten wäre, hätte er vielleicht gar nicht soo schlecht abgeschnitten. Er hatte schon eine wahnsinnig ausgeprägte Muskulatur, hast du mal gesehen wie er seine Flügel ausbreitet? Das sah aus, wie wenn er sich verdoppelt hätte.

IP: Logged

NOS Power

Beiträge: 199
Aus: Stuttgart
Registriert: 09.06.2003

30.03.2004 14:50     Profil von NOS Power   NOS Power eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
[quote:298460b888="stolzes Kind"]OH mein Gott ... Junge, das ist hier ein Bodybuilding Forum . Was zur Hölle hat hier irgend eine Kampfsportgurke verloren ?!!? Schick sowas ins Off-Topic ![/quote:298460b888] die "kampfsportgurke" würde dir, wenn er noch am leben wäre, dir mächtig in deinen allerwertesten treten.. @chriss top..vielen dank

IP: Logged

bayernviech

Beiträge: 1111
Aus: traunstein
Registriert: 26.08.2003

30.03.2004 15:20     Profil von bayernviech   bayernviech eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
ich finde es beachtlich obgleich auch nicht alle daten stimmen. ich meine da wurde teils übertrieben. @ NOS power natürlich würde er ihn besiegen aber nicht unbedingt durch kraft. sondern durch technik und schnellkraft und konzentrierte kraft.

IP: Logged

Gladiator777

Beiträge: 267
Aus: FFM/Moskau
Registriert: 23.06.2002

30.03.2004 15:42     Profil von Gladiator777   Gladiator777 eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
@chriss ein dickes lob :daumen: @stolzes Kind wenn ich deine logik folge..., dann frage ich mich was DU hier überhaupt machst :ratlos: , mit deinen 38 ärmchen? mit deinen massen bist du selber nicht annährend ein bb. sei bitte nicht beleidigt, ich habe nur deine gedankengänge fortgesetzt! im vergleich zum pit oder coleman bin ich auch ein wurst :-( was heisst für dich ein bb zu sein, bzw. was verstehst du darunter? übrigens, d.yates wurde durch bruce lee motiviert und zum training bewegt (nicht erwartet was? :-) ). ich bin selbst vom kampfsport ins bb gewechselt, wenn auch vielleicht vorübergehend... krafttraining ist mittlerweile ein fester bestandteil fast von jedem sportart. @mods hatten wir nicht eine kampfsport rubrik? viele Grüsse :winke:

IP: Logged

bayernviech

Beiträge: 1111
Aus: traunstein
Registriert: 26.08.2003

30.03.2004 15:52     Profil von bayernviech   bayernviech eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
diese rubrik gibts schon längere zeit nicht mehr. die hats schon nicht mehr gegeben als ich mich angemeldet hab.

IP: Logged

NOS Power

Beiträge: 199
Aus: Stuttgart
Registriert: 09.06.2003

30.03.2004 17:58     Profil von NOS Power   NOS Power eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
@bayernvieh hi, es ging mir nicht ums besiegen sondern dass er den bekanntesten asiaten, der geschichte geschrieben hat und den kampfsport populär gemacht hat, eine "kampfsportgurke" nennt.... er hat in seinem leben was erreicht im gegensatz zu anderen menschen!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1 wenn ich sowas höre werde ich sauer!!!!!

IP: Logged

lightning

Beiträge: 263
Aus: Braunschweig
Registriert: 12.03.2003

30.03.2004 18:14     Profil von lightning   lightning eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
@stolzes Kind: Du scheinst bisher der Einzige zu sein, der den Text nicht komplett gelesen hat und trotzdem sein Mundwerk am größten aufreist. Bruce Lee war kein Bodybuilder, aber hat mit den Methoden des Bodybuildings gearbeitet. Interessant sind seine Ansätze des Bauchmuskeltrainings (aufrollen, nicht nur SitUps) z.B., sieht irgendwie nach Crunches aus. Was ich also mein, dass er gar nicht so Bodybuilding fremd war. Falls du anderer Meinung bist, wissen wir das jetzt, und nun gut. MfG lightning

IP: Logged

stolzes Kind

Beiträge: 297
Aus: Aachen
Registriert: 23.08.2003

30.03.2004 19:10     Profil von stolzes Kind   stolzes Kind eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
[quote:c65f5b7b2c="Gladiator777"] @stolzes Kind wenn ich deine logik folge..., dann frage ich mich was DU hier überhaupt machst :ratlos: , mit deinen 38 ärmchen? mit deinen massen bist du selber nicht annährend ein bb. sei bitte nicht beleidigt, ich habe nur deine gedankengänge fortgesetzt! im vergleich zum pit oder coleman bin ich auch ein wurst :-( was heisst für dich ein bb zu sein, bzw. was verstehst du darunter? übrigens, d.yates wurde durch bruce lee motiviert und zum training bewegt (nicht erwartet was? :-) ). ich bin selbst vom kampfsport ins bb gewechselt, wenn auch vielleicht vorübergehend... krafttraining ist mittlerweile ein fester bestandteil fast von jedem sportart. [/quote:c65f5b7b2c] Ich bin absolut nicht beleidigt :D Nur was erwartest du von jemandem der seit ca. 2 Monaten erst ins Fitness Center geht ?!? Ist irgendwie klar dass ich noch keine "Mörderkeulen" hab. Bin selbst erst grad nach 8 Jahren Kampfsport dorthin gewechselt. Mit BB verbinde ich einfach sich seinen Körper so zu formen bis er einem gefällt. Was Bruce Lee gemacht hat ist sein körperliches und geistiges Potential auszunutzen. Ihm waren dabei das Erscheinungsbild absolut egal - was er wollte war wie gesagt "alles aus sich herauszuholen". Mag sein dass n paar Lebensweisheiten vom Bruce dabei auch im BB ansatzweise wiederzufinden sind, das begründet aber dennoch kein ganzes Thread für ihn in BB Allgemein. [quote:c65f5b7b2c="NOS Power"] die "kampfsportgurke" würde dir, wenn er noch am leben wäre, dir mächtig in deinen allerwertesten treten.. [/quote:c65f5b7b2c] Bei so nem Kommentar kann ich mir echt nur an den Kopf fassen!! :hammer: :klo:

IP: Logged

lightning

Beiträge: 263
Aus: Braunschweig
Registriert: 12.03.2003

30.03.2004 21:43     Profil von lightning   lightning eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
Die Beleidigungen waren nicht okay, da hast du Recht. Trotzdem sind die meisten nicht deiner Meinung, aber das ist auch okay. Wäre eigentlich ein guter Zeitpunkt, den Thread zu schließen... Ich denke, das meiste ist gesagt, hmm? Gruß lightning

IP: Logged

arena

Beiträge: 5778
Aus: Am Arsch der Welt
Registriert: 10.12.2002

30.03.2004 23:26     Profil von arena   arena eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
ganz schön langer Text - alles selber geschrieben? in gewisser Hinsicht hat Bruce lee schon BB (Körperformung) gemacht, zwar nicht auf Masse aber auf Härte und zwar stahlhart P.S. Hätte ich die Wahl zwischen Arnold S. und Bruce L. - würde ich Bruce L. wählen

IP: Logged

Gib8

Beiträge: 540
Aus: München
Registriert: 08.04.2003

30.03.2004 23:42     Profil von Gib8   Gib8 eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
@chris :respekt: @kind: Nun geh hinaus - in die weiten der Unterforen - und verkünde den ganzen Gewichtheber-Athleten, dass sie sich hier verziehn sollen, weil sie ja garkein wirkliches BB betreiben .... Mit diesen Worten Gute Nacht, Gib8

IP: Logged

destructivus

Beiträge: 437
Aus: wiEn3
Registriert: 01.09.2003

01.04.2004 13:43     Profil von destructivus   destructivus eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
man arena, was soll die frage alles selber geschrieben???? ersten englisch zweitens stehen ja dauernd namen drin, du hast wahrscheinlich nicht mal 4 sätze gelesen und nichtmal 2 davon verstanden

IP: Logged

bayernviech

Beiträge: 1111
Aus: traunstein
Registriert: 26.08.2003

01.04.2004 13:49     Profil von bayernviech   bayernviech eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
mal ruhig hier. es kann ja sein dass er es aus einem z.B. zeitungsartikel abgeschrieben hat. oder er hätte es reinkopieren können.

IP: Logged

arena

Beiträge: 5778
Aus: Am Arsch der Welt
Registriert: 10.12.2002

01.04.2004 22:20     Profil von arena   arena eine Nachricht schreiben     Beitrag editieren/löschen
[quote:5aa840f082="destructivus"]man arena, was soll die frage alles selber geschrieben???? ersten englisch zweitens stehen ja dauernd namen drin, du hast wahrscheinlich nicht mal 4 sätze gelesen und nichtmal 2 davon verstanden[/quote:5aa840f082] dass ich nicht alles gelesen habe stimmt (war mir etwas viel auf einmal), aber was ich gelesen habe hab ich auch verstanden. mit alles selber geschrieben meint ich auch selber "zusammengestrickt", gerade wal es ein dt./engl. Mix ist sowie Interview und Textpassagen - auf gut Deutsch ne menge arbeit :respekt:

IP: Logged


Neuen Beitrag erstellen  Antwort schreiben
Gehe zu:
Weitere Forenbeiträge:
trainingsumstieg, Kleine Modeschau von Fitness-Models, Video oder DVD der 45. deutschen Meisterschaft 2004 Germering...WO?, Das habe ich heute gegessen !?!, Body Attack Shop in Braunschweig, kleines problemnchen.., KH Übungen für den Rücken, zu wkm's Plan!, AAS und grippe?, Trainingsplan was sagt ihr dazu?, Dauergeil von und ohne Roid, Klimmzug+Kreuzheben=dicker und breiter Rücken, oder nur breit?, Was heisst WKM?, Frage zu Cola, Ich habe kartoffeln !, Ich liebe sie brauche euren rat bin fix und fertig, Ausführung von Rudern vorgebeugt..., Was haltet Ihr von den Produkten dieses Shops?, offeroptimizer, cardio+ wkm's trainingsplan?, Geben Muskeln eigentlich bis zu einem gewissen Grad, training für zwölf wochen, Soundproblem -->PC, Winstrol, auf kamerafahrt, Mike Mentzer, Artikel: 25 Tips um Masse aufzubauen, Die "Großen Fünf"!, Aktion 1: Dose Whey gratis, Macht Mineralwasser sauer ?


Themen dieser Seite:
Bruce, Lee, Techniken, Schüler, Wing, Chun, Wir, Aber, The, Ich, Jeet, Kune, Sie, Gung, John, Jesse, Glover, Kampf, Tritte, Weider, Little, Lees, Karate, Methode, Stil, Das, Danny, Training, Linda, Jackson


Shoplinks:

- Bodybuilding Szene Shop -
Delphin-Bernstein-Anhänger mit Sterling Silber
Dymatize HMB - 120 Kaps.
Body Attack Kreatin Kautabletten - 200 St.
Body Attack Bauchtasche
Body Attack Powerlifting Gürtel
CBT-380
OP-20
Natural Bodybuilding (Dr. Andreas Müller)
Schönes Bernstein Armband mit Silber in Herzform
DNE Pharmaceuticals Super Caps - 100 Kaps.
Armband mit Bernstein und Silber
Mini Vibes
BMS Designer Protein - 2kg
Body Attack L-Glutamin - 2x250g
Latex Kopfmaske Zip sw S-L

- Hardcore Shop -
Dymatize HMB - 120 Kaps.
Hardcore Products Amino 2100 - 325 Tabs.
D&E Super Caps Xtreme (Ephedra Free)-100 Caps
Hardcore Products Tribulus - 60 Kaps.
Hardcore Products Erybooster - 150 Tabl.
Powerman MCT Oil - 500g
Dymatize Super Multi - 120 Kaps.
Dymatize Guggul Complex - 90 Caps
S.A.N. Endotest - 90 Kaps.
Dymatize Supreme Whey - 908g
Vitalife Yohimbe 750 - 100 Kaps.
Dymatize Super Amino 4800 - 300 Kaps.
Hardcore Products Creatine Powder - 500g Dose
Hardcore Products HCA - 100 Kaps.
Dymatize L-Carnitine Xtreme - 500mg pro Kapsel

- Hot Sex Shop -
Vibrator Excellerator
Buch Best of Lesen verboten
Secura Sex4fun Sortiment 24er
Der geile Fahrplan
Leder Fußfessel
Penishülle Double Lover vibr.
Vibrator Florida-Dolphin
Nimm mich wie eine Hure
Set Sexy Fun Kit
Atlantis
ANOS Silikon-Fluid 100 ml
Overknees schwarz S-L
Energie-Stoß 1er 4 gr
Leder Bikiniset S-L
Vibrator riesig

- Berstein Shop -
NEPAL HALSKETTE SILBER MIT KORALLEN & MALACHITEN
STIER
Edles Armband aus grünem
Traumhaftes Armband aus
Edler Anhänger Multicolor Bernstein und Silber
Edler Bernstein-Silber-Ring
Extravagante Bernstein-Silber-Brosche
Wunderschöne Multicolor Bernstein Ohrstecker mit Silber
Silber Anhänger
WASSERMANN
Edler Bernstein Anhänger
NEPAL ARMREIF SILBER MIT KORALLEN
Bezaubernde Bernstein Halskette
Anhänger in Multicolor
Silber Schlangen Halskette

- Hantelshop -
SZ-G
Elliptical Crosstrainer Endurance Pro CS HRC
CCO-112
EXM-4000
PSG-442
LM-84SM
Stack-M1
FID-70
PCH-24
SCR-49
PSG-452
Doppelgriff
PA-3
FID-71
VLP-56


Links:
PLinks PL2 Board Site Forum Stat Buch BB 1 2 3 Fit Inhalte Protein Shop Produkte Hardcore SS AN 2 Print RS EX Buch BF M2K Seo AOP PP PS AJS IH GP SpSa HT BSS SA SAS BSS HBB